im体育|平台

<acronym id="6ekq2"></acronym>
<acronym id="6ekq2"><center id="6ekq2"></center></acronym>
<acronym id="6ekq2"><rt id="6ekq2"></rt></acronym>
<rt id="6ekq2"><optgroup id="6ekq2"></optgroup></rt>
<acronym id="6ekq2"></acronym><acronym id="6ekq2"></acronym>
<acronym id="6ekq2"></acronym>
<rt id="6ekq2"><optgroup id="6ekq2"></optgroup></rt>
<rt id="6ekq2"><center id="6ekq2"></center></rt>
<acronym id="6ekq2"><center id="6ekq2"></center></acronym>
<acronym id="6ekq2"><small id="6ekq2"></small></acronym>
<rt id="6ekq2"><optgroup id="6ekq2"></optgroup></rt>
<acronym id="6ekq2"><center id="6ekq2"></center></acronym>
<rt id="6ekq2"></rt>
<acronym id="6ekq2"></acronym>
Showing posts with label amazon. Show all posts
Showing posts with label amazon. Show all posts

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Google Getting Serious about Enterprise IT

This just in: Google has just announced hiring of Rob Enslin as President of Global Customer Operations for its Google Cloud unit.

Why is this a big deal? Because Enslin only in the past month announced his departure from SAP, where he spent 27 years and was most recently in charge of SAP's entire cloud portfolio. He was also a member of SAP's executive board.

Enslin will be reporting to Thomas Kurian, who was recently hired on by Google as the CEO of Google Cloud. Kurian, of course, was highly regarded during his 22 year career at Oracle, where he was most recently the President of Product Development. He was also the brains behind Oracle's Fusion line of cloud applications, which represent Oracle's future as a cloud applications services provider.

Kurian writes:
Today, it is my pleasure to introduce Robert Enslin, Google Cloud’s new President of Global Customer Operations. Rob’s expertise in building and running organizations globally, business acumen and deep customer and partner relationships make him a perfect fit for this crucial role. Rob will report to me, and he starts on April 22. Rob spent the last 27 years at SAP in leadership roles across sales and operations, most recently as the President, Cloud Business Group and Executive Board Member. He developed and managed SAP’s entire cloud product portfolio, led the field revenue and enablement efforts across multiple geographies, and oversaw core functions including professional services, ecosystem, channel, and solutions. Rob brings great international experience to his role having worked in South Africa, Europe, Asia and the United States—this global perspective will be invaluable as we expand Google Cloud into established industries and growth markets around the world.
Just today in a private message a fellow analyst said, in another context, that the "enterprise software boat is being rocked." I replied that it needs to be rocked, and maybe it needs to be capsized.

Perhaps Google getting serious about enterprise technology is just what the market needs. For now, Google's immediate objective appears to be to take on Amazon and Microsoft for cloud infrastructure services. But with hiring of Kurian and Enslin, will Google also start moving into enterprise applications? Or will it be content to just be a platform provider>

Watch for who are the next new hires. That will give us a clue.

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Open Source Not a Panacea for Cloud Infrastructure Decisions

Cloud IaaS Open Source
When it comes to cloud computing, do open systems win out over proprietary standards? My view is, perhaps in theory, but cloud computing--specifically public cloud infrastructure--has bigger problems right now than whether it's built on open source. Furthermore, open source cloud infrastructure providers have obstacles to overcome. 

I'm participating in an online video debate on October 29, hosted by IBM's Smarter Computing program, on "the pros and cons of open computing when it comes to cloud, big data, and software defined environments." This post outlines part of my viewpoint on this subject.

What's Not to Like about Open Source?

One of the problem in debating "open source" is that it is difficult to argue against the word "open" as a concept. For example, we all like to think of ourselves as open-minded, not close-minded. We admire top executives who have an open-door policy--have you ever heard of a manager with a "closed door policy?" In home-buying, sellers like to point out the open floor plan. Who ever advertised a house as having a "closed" floor plan?

So also, in computing, open just sounds better. Moreover, when it comes to cloud infrastructure, open source projects such as OpenStack and CloudStack have admirable goals, such as the ease of porting computing workloads from one cloud provider to another, promoting competition, and escaping the dreaded vendor lock-in.

The Larger Issue: Adoption

But, to me, it is premature to debate about whether open source cloud infrastructure is better. The larger issue today is the small percentage of corporate IT organizations that embrace public cloud infrastructure at all. In our Technology Trends survey at Computer Economics last year, we found that less than 10% of IT organizations worldwide have any use or plans to use public cloud infrastructure. Moreover, of these, only half claim use it, or intend to use it, for production systems.

If they are not using public cloud for production systems, then what are they using it for? Our survey found interest in public cloud for software development and testing, disaster recovery capabilities (such as backup and recovery), or for archiving older data.

In addition, I question some of those production uses of IaaS. Discussions with associates who advise data center managers confirm my suspicions. One associate, who works a lot in the entertainment industry, pointed out that one popular use of cloud infrastructure is in rendering animated film. In this case, animators require enormous amounts of computing power and storage to render even a few minutes of animation. As it turns out, cloud infrastructure is perfect for such a use, as it frees the IT organization from having to maintain those high levels of computing resources, which are only used sporadically. Furthermore, the risk is low. If the cloud provider goes down in the middle of a rendering job, the animator can simply resubmit the job. Nothing is lost.

But when it comes to production systems, such as accounting systems or royalty processing, these same entertainment industry decision-makers shun cloud infrastructure. It is not that they want to keep such systems on-premises, as witnessed by the fact that they have been outsourcing their data centers to managed services providers for years. As my associate remarked, "CIOs don't want to be in the data center business any more." But, rightly or wrongly, they are cautious about entrusting production systems to a cloud infrastructure.

Open Source Not a Panacea

Although the goals of OpenStack and other open source cloud projects are admirable, they may be a solution in search of a problem.
  • Specifically, migrating workloads between competing cloud providers may not be as big a deal as open source proponents claim. Customer demands are already forcing competing cloud providers to recognize and support each other's APIs. For example, some members of the OpenStack community are urging support for Amazon's APIs.  If OpenStack fully goes this route, application systems written for Amazon's cloud will be able to be deployed on an OpenStack cloud without a lot of migration effort. Even VMware--the vendor with the largest stake in so-called private clouds--supports Amazon APIs and is also a contributor to OpenStack. Therefore, as far as I can tell, portability is not a major issue.
  • Second, so far, it does not seem as if proprietary cloud providers are using their proprietary standards in order to extract higher fees from customers. Quite to the contrary, cloud infrastructure is a very competitive market. Whatever concerns IT decision makers have about public cloud infrastructure, one thing they cannot complain about is its cost. Leading cloud providers are not raising prices--rather, they are cutting prices, in some cases many times a year. IT decision makers are not holding on to their on-premises systems because they are concerned about the cost of public cloud--they are focused on risk. This was also a key finding in our Technology Trends survey.
If a cloud provider wants to overcome enterprise IT buyer concerns, it should focus on reliability, security, privacy, and offer a well-staffed support group. Many of the OpenStack providers are doing exactly that. It may well be that OpenStack providers, such as IBM, H-P, Dell, Rackspace and others, will be successful because of their value-added services, not because they embraced an open source infrastructure.

Incumbent Infrastructure Providers Have an Edge

Furthermore, proponents of open source cloud infrastructure may be underestimating the advantage that on-premises infrastructure providers have in moving their customers to the public cloud. Although, as discussed above, IT leaders have concerns about moving production workloads to the public cloud, one thing that does appeal to some of them is the ability to move seamlessly from on-premises system instances to cloud instances.

This is the so-called hybrid cloud infrastructure. CIOs may adopt a hybrid cloud strategy in order to move non-critical workloads out of the data center, freeing up system resources (e.g. the animation rendering application discussed above), or to "burst" to the cloud during period of high demand for system resources (e.g. during a major advertising campaign that strains an in-house e-commerce system).

Now, which provider has the advantage in helping IT organizations set up hybrid cloud capabilities? The provider that is already serving the on-premises data center (Microsoft, VMware, or Oracle, for example) or the one that would like the data center to replatform its on-premises systems to match the infrastructure of the provider's cloud infrastructure (e.g. OpenStack, CloudStack)?

The answer is obvious, which is why Microsoft, VMware, and Oracle are all providing public cloud services that require very little change to the customer's on-premises infrastructure. Unless an IT organization is building a data center from scratch, it is unlikely to want to standardize its internal infrastructure on a completely new technology--open source or otherwise.

Advocating for Cloud and Open Source

Nothing I've written here should be taken as an argument against cloud computing or open source. I've been blogging on these subjects since 2002 and consider myself as an advocate of both. In my view, one day nearly all systems will be delivered via cloud computing, and open source software has proven itself to be a viable business model for a variety of software categories, especially for lower levels in the technology stack. But in the case of public cloud infrastructure, I don't see open source cloud projects as dominating the market any time soon.

Update: The video of my IBM debate is now online. You can watch it by clicking the image below.

http://www.spreecast.com/events/whats-next-for-it-open-source-debate

Related Posts

The Inexorable Dominance of Cloud Computing
Cutting Through the Fog of Cloud Computing Definitions

Photo Credit: Flickr, followtheseinstructions
<acronym id="6ekq2"></acronym>
<acronym id="6ekq2"><center id="6ekq2"></center></acronym>
<acronym id="6ekq2"><rt id="6ekq2"></rt></acronym>
<rt id="6ekq2"><optgroup id="6ekq2"></optgroup></rt>
<acronym id="6ekq2"></acronym><acronym id="6ekq2"></acronym>
<acronym id="6ekq2"></acronym>
<rt id="6ekq2"><optgroup id="6ekq2"></optgroup></rt>
<rt id="6ekq2"><center id="6ekq2"></center></rt>
<acronym id="6ekq2"><center id="6ekq2"></center></acronym>
<acronym id="6ekq2"><small id="6ekq2"></small></acronym>
<rt id="6ekq2"><optgroup id="6ekq2"></optgroup></rt>
<acronym id="6ekq2"><center id="6ekq2"></center></acronym>
<rt id="6ekq2"></rt>
<acronym id="6ekq2"></acronym>

01彩票平台

彩福彩票

在线娱乐赌博平台排名

富鱼彩票登录

怎样开通九州体育竞技平台

90vs比分足球

体育投注网皇冠足球开户

乐彩网首页福彩下载

ag88环亚娱